History of Quarrying in Hong Kong

Event starts: 7pm Hong Kong time. Facing the problem of severe housing shortage, the Hong Kong government once again puts forth land reclamation as an option to increase land availability for housing development.
History of Quarrying in Hong Kong

This event is at 7pm Hong Kong time. PowerPoint in English and presentation in Cantonese.

About the event

Since the start of the Colonial Hong Kong era in 1842, the quarrying industry had become one of Hong Kong’s major economic pillar, bringing plentiful business and job opportunities. Of the over 7,400 residents on the Hong Kong Island in the early 1840s, about one-fourth were in quarrying related jobs. During the industry’s prime time in the early 20th century, there were over 100 quarries scattered in Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and the New Territories.
 
Hong Kong was once situated in an active volcanic zone. Frequent volcanic eruptions covered the city with volcanic and intrusive igneous rocks. In particular, the abundance of quality granitic rock provided valuable material for a number of early infrastructure constructions, including the Murray House (completed in 1845), the Museum of Tea Ware (completed in 1846, previously named as Flag Staff House), Central School (constructed from 1884 to 1889), The Bethanie (constructed from 1873 to 1875, now the Bethanie Campus of Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts), former Marine Police Headquarters (completed in 1884, now renamed as “1881 Heritage”) and The Supreme Court of Hong Kong (completed in 1912, now the Court of Final Appeal). Walls, fences and old buildings constructed from granites are still visible everywhere these days.
 
Designer and constructor of Murray House, Major Aldrich and Lieutenant Collison of the Royal Engineers were responsible for the construction of a number of colonial military architecture. In 1846, Major Aldrich wrote about the construction of the Murray House in the Professional Papers of the Corp of Royal Engineers, sharing with engineers around the world how Chinese workers followed the principle of mechanics to transport large granite columns and cutting-edge architectural experience.
Back then, building materials and dimension stone from quarries were not only used to meet local demand but were also exported for construction in neighbouring regions and overseas. Granite used in building the French Catholic Church in Canton (construction began in 1863 and completed in 1888) was from the Ngau Tau Kok quarry and the Cha Kwo Ling quarry. In San Francisco, The Parrott Building (completed in 1852, demolished in 1926) was constructed using granite from Hong Kong and with the support of Hong Kong construction workers.
 

Speaker

Ir Dr. S.W. Poon is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Real Estate and Construction, The University of Hong Kong.

 

Event Date Time
24 / 06 / 2022 07:00 pm–08:30 pm
Registration Closes
24 / 06 / 2022 08:00 pm
Hybrid
Cost
  • Members:
    Free
  • Non Members:
    Free (HKD20 if need CPD Certificate)
Cost
Webinar
Member Rate
0.00
0.00
Webinar
Student Member Rate
0.00
0.00
Webinar
Non-Member Rate
0.00
0.00
Key Speaker(s)
Ir Dr. S.W. Poon
Host(s)
Engineers Australia Hong Kong Chapter
Event Contact
Maximum CPD Hours
1.5